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Definition

By Mayo Clinic staff

Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence is prompted by a physical movement or activity — such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — that puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related to psychological stress.

Stress incontinence is also different from urge incontinence, which is the unintentional loss of urine caused by the bladder muscle contracting, usually associated with a sense of urgency. Stress incontinence is much more common in women than men.

If you have stress incontinence, you may feel embarrassed, isolate yourself, or limit your work and social life, especially exercise and leisure activities. With treatment, you'll likely be able to manage stress incontinence and improve your overall well-being.

References
  1. Clemens JQ. Urinary incontinence in men. http://www.uptodate.com/index. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  2. DuBeau CE. Clinical presentation and diagnosis of urinary incontinence. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 2, 2013.
  3. DuBeau CE. Epidemiology, risk factors, and pathogenesis of urinary incontinence. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 2, 2013.
  4. DuBeau CE. Treatment of urinary incontinence. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 2, 2013.
  5. Urinary incontinence. WomensHealth.gov. http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/urinary-incontinence.html. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  6. Urinary incontinence in women. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/uiwomen/index.htm. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  7. Bladder and bowel health. National Association for Continence. http://www.nafc.org/. Accessed Jan. 2, 2013.
  8. Urinary incontinence in men. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/uimen/index.aspx. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  9. Frequently asked questions. Gynecological problems FAQ081. Urinary incontinence. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq081.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20121218T1703471630. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  10. Loss of bladder control. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/ucm118544.htm. Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.
  11. Frequently asked questions. Gynecological problems FAQ166. Surgery for stress urinary incontinence. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq166.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20130102T2043435319. Accessed Jan. 2, 2013.
  12. Hayder D. The effects of urinary incontinence on sexuality: Seeking an intimate partnership. Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing. 2012;39:539.
  13. Petrou SP (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 28, 2013.
  14. Lightner DT (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 21, 2013.
DS00828 Feb. 7, 2013

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